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GO FRIARS

THIS IS FRIARS FOOTBALL!

2014 IHSA 7A PLAYOFF ELITE 8
2013 CHICAGO CATHOLIC LEAGUE WHITE DIVISION CHAMPIONS
2012 CHICAGO CATHOLIC LEAGUE WHITE DIVISION CHAMPIONS 
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Student-Athletes
 
We are very proud of our graduating seniors, in particular,
the 12 senior football players who maintained a 4.0 GPA average
or better based on 8 semesters of academic work.
 
Matt Bindon (Univ. of Illinois), Austin Gharib (Univ. of Illinois), Michael Cahill (Notre Dame),
Will Halleran (Univ. of Illinois), Michael Krecek (Notre Dame), John Mullen (Notre Dame),
Brian O'Neill (Univ. of Illinois), Thomas Penicook (Univ. of Illinois),
Ryan Pierson (Notre Dame), Peter Salvino (Johns Hopkins),
John Showel (Univ. of Illinois), Scott Stibich (Univ. of Wisconsin)
 
True student athletes!
 
Among those, we congratulate Class Valedictorian, John Mullen,
and Salutatorian, Ryan Pierson
from 2014 State Quarterfinalist team
 
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Why Football Matters
By John Harbaugh

Football is under attack, but the game and the values it instills in young men are critical to our society.

http://www.baltimoreravens.com/assets/images/imported/BAL/news-articles/2015/04-April/04/22_WhyFootballMatters_news.jpg 

The game of football is under attack.We see it every day in the headlines and on the news. The medical concerns are pressing. The game has taken its share of criticism. President Barack Obama said that if he had boys he wouldn’t let them play football. Even LeBron James has publicly said no football in his house.The question is asked over and over:  Why would anyone want to play football? And why would anyone let their kids play? Here’s my answer: I believe there’s practically no other place where a young man is held to a higher standard. Football is hard. It’s tough. It demands discipline. It teaches obedience. It builds character. Football is a metaphor for life. This game asks a young man to push himself further than he ever thought he could go. It literally challenges his physical courage. It shows him what it means to sacrifice. It teaches him the importance of doing his job well. We learn to put others first, to be part of something bigger than ourselves. And we learn to lift our teammates – and ourselves – up together. These are rare lessons nowadays. Football has faced challenges like this before. In 1905, there were 19 player deaths and at least 137 serious injuries. Many of these occurred at the high school and college levels. Major colleges said they were going to drop football because the game had become too violent. That’s when President Teddy Roosevelt stepped in to call a meeting with coaches and athletic advisers from Harvard, Princeton and Yale. He wanted to find a way to make the game safer. They made significant changes, introducing new rules like the forward pass and the wide receiver position. Those changes turned football more into the game we know it as today. We made progress. Rules changed. Society evolved. The game advanced. We’re at another turning point in our sport. The concussion issue is real and we have to face it. We have to continue to get players in better helmets. We have to teach tackling the right way, and that starts at the NFL level. Change the rules. Take certain things out of the game. It’s all the right thing to do. But even with all of that, the importance of football hasn’t changed. In some ways, it’s more important than ever. And I believe the most critical place for football is at the youth and high school levels. For 97 percent of football players, the pinnacle of their careers is the high school game. Few players ever go on to the college level. Even less make it to the pros. For a lot of these kids, it’s not until it’s all said and done, and they look back on it several years later, that they realize the difference the sport made in their lives. They are proud of playing the game. Have you ever met anybody who accomplished playing four years of high school football, and at the end of that run said, ‘Man, I wish I wouldn’t have played’? It doesn’t get said. We know that football players aren’t perfect. Nobody is. But millions of former players, one by one, can recount the life-altering principles they learned from football.

They know the
value of football is the values in football.

That’s why high school football – and particularly high school coaches – play such a vital role in our society. Our football coaches are on the front lines of the battle for the hearts and minds of the young men in our society. The culture war is on and we see it every day. These young men are more vulnerable than ever. How many youth and high school coaches serve as a father figure to their players? How many mothers look to the coaches of their son’s football team as the last best hope to show their son what it means to become a man – a real man? More than we’ll ever know. Coaches teach our young people the lessons of life that very often they learn from no one else. Coaches have the kind of influence in our schools, and with our young people, that is difficult to come by. Billy Graham once said, “One coach will influence more people in one year than the average person will do in a lifetime.” My dad also says all the time that it just takes one person to believe in a young man or young woman to change their lives. I couldn’t agree more. Our culture teaches us to judge an activity by how it’s going to make us feel right now. But football doesn’t work that way. The game challenges and pushes us. It’s often uncomfortable. It requires us to be at our best. Isn’t that what we want in our society? Football is a great sport. Football teams can be, and very often are, the catalyst for good in our schools and our communities. Millions of young men have learned lessons in football that they could only learn through playing this game. Football has saved lives. That is why football matters.

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ALL LEVELS!!!
 
ZENITH FOOTBALL CAMPS - "Z CAMPS" - AT THE PRIORY
 
All football players - all levels are strongly encouraged to attend Z-camps
on Friday, June 12 (5pm-8pm), Saturday, June 13 (1pm-4pm) and Sunday, June 14 (8am-11am). 
On field demonstrations, teaching skills, developmental/position
skills and practice will occur over these 3-days. 
This camp, which Coach Nudo has run in Arizona, will feature “guest” coaches from all over
the country bringing high school, college and professional experience to our athletes. 
The Fenwick coaching staff will be assisting these coaches,
allowing our coaches an opportunity to observe and evaluate our athletes. 
The cost is $250.00 (may be paid online) and will include a jersey and shorts. 
Players are asked to bring their helmets and shoulder pads along with water. 
Please fill out the registration form on line at www.fenwickfriars under Ultra Camps
and then under Z Camps. 
 
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QUOTE OF THE DAY:
 
Lou Holtz
“Ability is what you're capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it.” 
 
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GAME PHOTOS 
The Photo Gallery has images from the varsity games.
Please follow the instructions to access ALL the photos. 
If you want a photo (or many), THEY ARE FREE.
 
Example

CLICK on the photo you like. Then SCROLL over that photo.
Some options will pop up on the right side of the photo.
Click the "SAVE" icon to download the photo to your e-device.
It's pretty simple, and again, free!
 
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